This Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna is a fishy take on Orange Chicken. This delicious dinner show-stopper is easy to prepare and ready in 15 minutes.

Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna

This Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna is a fishy take on Orange Chicken. This delicious dinner show-stopper is easy to prepare and ready in 15 minutes.

Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna

This Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna is a fishy take on Orange Chicken. This delicious dinner show-stopper is easy to prepare and ready in 15 minutes.  This post is sponsored by Orca Bay Seafoods, but as always, all opinions are my own.

Last year, I fell in love.  Yes, that’s right– I fell head over heels for a fish.  Which fish?  Was it salmon that captured my heart?  Cod that gave me a giddy smile?  Trout that made me gush to all my friends?  No, no, and nope!  (Although I won’t lie– I love all those fish too!)  This time, it was ahi tuna that made my heart skip a beat, and I just can’t get enough!  It’s flavor-packed, it’s filling and meaty, and best of all– it’s EASY!  As in, ridiculously easy.  This Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna is a take on the meatier Orange Chicken.  It’s marinated for ten minutes, cooks in about one minute (yes that’s right– ONE minute), and is topped off with a simple sauce made from the marinade.

In a hurry? Jump to the recipe! 

This Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna is a fishy take on Orange Chicken. This delicious dinner show-stopper is easy to prepare and ready in 15 minutes.

Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna

If you’re wondering how a fish-obsessed, seafood junkie like me hadn’t eaten ahi tuna until a year ago, here’s what happened.  I have eaten it before.  In fact, I’ve eaten ahi tuna FOR YEARS.  Here’s how my ahi tuna experiences went– I’d order it at a restaurant, cringe when it came out looking like bright red raw beef, and then I’d eat it anyway.  Sometimes it was delicious, but more often it was ‘eh.’  I’d actually given up on ahi tuna, tired of the ‘will it be good?’ gamble, when I stumbled across a bag of Orca Bay Seafood’s Ahi Tuna at a local health food store last year.  On a whim, I bought it.  Here’s what happened.

This Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna is a fishy take on Orange Chicken. This delicious dinner show-stopper is easy to prepare and ready in 15 minutes.

Prepping Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna

When I got home, I opened the package of frozen tuna steaks, and immediately noticed one thing.  One big thing.  The tuna steaks weren’t bright red.  Curious, I grabbed the packaging, double-checked the dates (yes, it was fresh), the labeling (line caught, non-gmo), and then decided to go ahead and thaw out the steaks and make some dinner.  Dinner, by the way, was DELICIOUS.  (This dinner, to be precise.)

Choosing High Quality Tuna

While I was marinating the steaks, I did some research.  Why, exactly, is some ahi tuna bright red?  The answer wasn’t very pretty.  The answer is carbon monoxide.  Yes, that’s right, seafood companies often spray carbon monoxide on their tuna to make it bright red.  Don’t believe me?  Check the label.  I have.  It’s right there on the package– I had just never noticed it before.  The gas is supposed to be tasteless, but I still don’t want to eat it.

This Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna is a fishy take on Orange Chicken. This delicious dinner show-stopper is easy to prepare and ready in 15 minutes.

Does it affect the flavor of the tuna?  It’s not supposed to, but in my opinion, companies that spray their fish with chemicals can’t necessarily be trusted to deliver the highest quality seafood anyway.  Personally, I’m sticking with the chemical-free tuna.

For the last year, my absolute favorite tuna has come from Orca Bay.  Need help finding their products?  Check out their store finder, order online (using the promo code: champagnetastes for 15% off!), or try these vendors: Ingles, Giant Eagle, Dierbergs, and Natural Grocers / Vitamin Cottage.  (Note: if you don’t have one of these stores in your local area, but do have a health food store, check there!  That’s where I find my Orca Bay tuna.)

Gathering Ingredients

Once you’ve picked out your tuna steaks, you can start collecting everything else you need for this Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna.  Grab some green onions, rice vinegar (this should either be in the Asian food aisle or with other vinegars), soy sauce, brown sugar, ginger paste, and garlic paste.  (Both the ginger and garlic pastes should be in the produce section near the fresh herbs.  Alternatively, use fresh grated ginger and minced garlic).  You’ll also need two oranges– any kind will do.  I used a cara cara orange and a blood orange, but regular oranges will work just fine!

This Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna is a fishy take on Orange Chicken. This delicious dinner show-stopper is easy to prepare and ready in 15 minutes.

Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna

Making Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna

Now that you’ve got all your ingredients together, you’re going to put most of them into a blender or food processor.  Set the steaks and orange zest aside, and put the vinegar, soy sauce, orange juice, ginger, garlic, green onion, and brown sugar into a blender and blend it all up.  Place the steaks in a dish to marinate, and pour the sauce all over them.  Let them marinate for about 10 minutes.  A few minutes before they’re done marinating, add some olive oil to a heavy pan, and set it over medium-high heat.

When the pan is hot and the oil is shimmering, remove the steaks from the marinade, sprinkle the orange zest over the steaks, and set them in the pan.  Cook them for 15-30 seconds per side.  You don’t want the tuna to cook through, you just want to sear the edges.  Remove the steaks from the pan, and cover them with a towel to keep them warm.  Lower the burner heat to medium, and pour the marinade into the pan.  Let it cook down for about a minute.  If it’s thicker than you like, add a little more orange juice.  Serve your tuna in long thin slices with the sauce and a few diced green onions.  Eat this delicious, meaty fish immediately, and you’ll fall in love with ahi tuna before the second bite.

This Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna is a fishy take on Orange Chicken. This delicious dinner show-stopper is easy to prepare and ready in 15 minutes.

Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna

A Note on Seafood Labeling: When you’re fish shopping in the seafood freezer aisle, you might be tempted to pay extra for the “sushi grade” label, but be aware– It means nothing.  And by nothing, I mean that it isn’t regulated by the FDA.  

A Note on Seafood Safety and Raw / Undercooked Fish: The safest way to consume raw fish is to make sure that it’s been flash-frozen to kill anything that could later make you sick.  If you’re worried that frozen fish won’t be as tasty, keep in mind that even high-end sushi restaurants use frozen seafood.  Also Note: I’m not a doctor, and I’m not giving medical advice here.  If your doctor says you shouldn’t eat raw fish because you’re at a higher risk for getting sick (i.e.– if you’re pregnant or have a different medical condition that makes it unsafe), talk to them, not me, before chowing down on this lovely tuna.  

Want more seafood?  Try this:

This Seared Paprika Salmon with Cranberry Chutney is a show-stopping seafood centerpiece. Both the salmon and chutney are ready, start to finish, in about 15 minutes.

Seared Paprika Salmon with Cranberry Chutney

This Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna is a fishy take on Orange Chicken. This delicious dinner show-stopper is easy to prepare and ready in 15 minutes.
5 from 11 votes
Print

Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna

Course Main Course
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 2 people
Calories 454 kcal
Author Champagne Tastes

Ingredients

  • 2 ahi tuna steaks (~6oz per person) (recommendation- Orca Bay tuna)
  • 2 TB rice vinegar
  • 2 TB soy sauce
  • 2 oranges, juiced and zested
  • 1 TB ginger paste (or shaved ginger)
  • 1 TB garlic paste (or minced garlic)
  • 2 green onions, plus more for garnish
  • 1 TB brown sugar
  • 1 TB olive oil

Instructions

  1. Blend vinegar, soy sauce, orange juice, ginger, garlic, green onions, and sugar together in a blender.  Marinate tuna steaks in blended sauce for about 10 minutes.  Sprinkle zest over steaks at the end of the marinade.

  2. Heat oil in a heavy bottom pan (like a cast iron pan) on high, until oil is very hot. Reserving marinade for later, sear tuna for 15-30 seconds per side, then remove from pan. Reduce heat to medium and allow pan to cool slightly. Add marinade to pan, and stir with a wooden spoon. If sauce is too thick for your liking, add more orange juice. Remove sauce from heat.

  3. Serve tuna in long thin strips with the sauce.  Top with diced green onion if desired.

Recipe Notes

*Calorie Information was calculated per serving using My Fitness Pal.

57 thoughts on “Ginger Orange Seared Ahi Tuna

  1. Tina says:

    I love that ahi tuna literally takes only 15-30 seconds to prepare on the pan, and this marinade sounds equally as quick. Dinner will be served soon!

  2. Meg | Meg is Well says:

    It’s so weird what food companies will do to food because they think we want it to look a certain way. Pink ginger, black olives, yellow cheese. Sigh. This looks super delicious, easy, and light (which is so nice after all that Super Bowl Food).

  3. Amanda says:

    I prefer tuna over salmon, and this dish looks incredible. It is so fast to prepare, too. You seriously can’t go wrong pairing citrus with tuna. 🙂 (On a side note, did you know that most commercial grown tomatoes are gassed to cause them ripen after picked? Just a tidbit I learned from knowing people in the packing business.)

  4. Ali @ Home & Plate says:

    How interesting about how tuna is sold. I have never purchased red tuna and would think there was something wrong right away. Maybe because I am used to buying fresh from the fish market. I love the idea of adding cara cara or blood oranges to bring out the flavor of the freshest of tuna.

  5. Tina Marie says:

    In my opinion, this is the only water to eat Tuna! It took me awhile to enjoy eating Tuna Steaks, but they are truly delicious. I really love your recipe and can’t wait to try it.

  6. Byron Thomas says:

    I’m always super impressed by how the taste of seafood is so easily highlighted by the simple addition of citrus. And that sauce – the ginger and soy – yum! Sounds wonderfully delicious!

  7. Megan Marlowe says:

    Your seafood recipes lately are nothing short of amazing sounding. Again, I have never made ahi tuna at home, but love to order it when we go out. I love the ginger orange that you paired with this, it sounds so delicious. And I’ll have to check out Orca Bay!

    • champagne-tastes says:

      I’m landlocked and don’t have a choice, but for this recipe I prefer it! That way I can make sure it’s safe to eat 🙂

  8. Jolina says:

    Now that is very useful, we always associate bright red with fresh. Now we know! And yeah, we don’t want to eat that either (I mean, who would??). Yikes. (PS: dish looks amazing, and that marinade…yum!)

  9. Marisa Franca @ All Our Way says:

    Well, I’m a bit jealous! We are in love with the same fish. Although I must admit that my heart can be swayed by some wild caught salmon. I agree with wanting the freshest and most natural kind of fish. We normally buy only wild caught and from the fish case. Unfortunately, there is no label to look at. I love a citrus sauce with fish — YUM!

    • champagne-tastes says:

      Thanks! And sadly the “fresh” seafood I find at the counter here is actually shipped in frozen and then thawed, so I’d rather control the thaw time myself! It makes me nervous when it sits out like that

  10. Abigail Raines says:

    I often wondered why some tuna are indeed more vibrant looking than others and now I know why. I think that’s a disgusting practice and I am glad to learn about this! This seared AHI Tuna looks absolutely delicious!

  11. Julie | Bunsen Burner Bakery says:

    I didn’t realize that Orca Bay was sushi-grade tuna and safe for eating (mostly) raw! This is great to know – I love tuna steaks as rare as possible, but I never make them at home since it’s hard to find sushi grade tuna at most commercial grocery stores.

    • champagne-tastes says:

      Actually, sushi grade is a totally unregulated term! (I’ve got links and info on this in the post footnotes.) What you want to look for is quality fish from a reliable source, and my preference is for fish that’s been frozen because it’s been proven to be safer. (The info and reference links for that are in the post footnotes too!) I’m really into eating raw / semi raw fish, and also REALLY like to not get sick! Haha. So using frozen fish is the only way I’ll make it at home.

  12. Monica says:

    Thanks so much for sharing the info about how to find and purchase quality tuna – this is something that has always been a vague concern to me when buying for dishes like this! Now I feel more prepared to make good decisions!

  13. Lisa says:

    This looks incredible, and I love how easy you make it seem! And ugh…why must so many food companies ruin otherwise perfectly delicious and healthy food with chemicals?!? It’s just so WRONG!!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *